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image: Monitoring Mitochondrial Mutations

Monitoring Mitochondrial Mutations

By Catherine Offord | April 18, 2016

Induced pluripotent stem cells—particularly those generated from older patients—should be screened for defects in mitochondrial DNA, a study shows.

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image: Zika Seeks, Destroys Developing Neurons

Zika Seeks, Destroys Developing Neurons

By Tanya Lewis | April 11, 2016

The virus infects and kills human neural stem cells and impedes brain tissue development, according to a study.

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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By Kerry Grens | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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image: One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

By Kerry Grens | April 5, 2016

Certain immune cells surrounding the organ appear to block viral entry.

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image: Hairy Skin from Stem Cells

Hairy Skin from Stem Cells

By Tanya Lewis | April 5, 2016

Researchers create lab-grown mouse skin complete with hair follicles and sweat glands.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By The Scientist Staff | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By Anna Azvolinsky | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Tumor Traps

Tumor Traps

By Kerry Grens | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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image: More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

By Jef Akst | March 8, 2016

A second study finds evidence that feeding children peanuts could help prevent them from developing allergies to the legume later in life.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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