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image: Olfaction Determines Weight in Mice

Olfaction Determines Weight in Mice

By | July 5, 2017

Animals lacking a sense of smell stayed thinner than their smelling counterparts, despite eating the same amount.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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image: Image of the Day: Smell You Later

Image of the Day: Smell You Later

By | May 15, 2017

Adult olfactory stem cells can be used to grow a smattering of cells important for smell, including scent-sniffing neurons and structurally supportive sustentacular cells. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | May 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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The lungs of extremely premature lambs supported in a closed, sterile environment that enables fluid-based gas exchange grow and develop normally, researchers report.

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image: Image of the Day: Stop Signals

Image of the Day: Stop Signals

By | April 17, 2017

Transcytosis, suppression of vesicle traffic across cells, helps reduce permeability in the blood-retinal barrier during development.

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image: Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

Image of the Day: Tubular Origins

By | March 23, 2017

Murine neural tubes, with each image highlighting a different embryonic tissue type (blue). The neural tube itself (left) grows into the brain, spine, and nerves, while the mesoderm (middle) develops into other organs, and the ectoderm (right) forms skin, teeth, and hair.

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