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image: Children With Malaria Smell More Attractive to Mosquitoes

Children With Malaria Smell More Attractive to Mosquitoes

By Shawna Williams | April 17, 2018

The parasite changes people’s scent, primarily due to an increase in aldehydes.

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Responses to compounds in human sweat may help explain why people with autism spectrum disorder tend to struggle with social cues.

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image: Image of the Day: Smell You Later  

Image of the Day: Smell You Later  

By The Scientist Staff | September 5, 2017

Scientists demonstrate that just the right amount of inflammation after an injury to a mouse’s olfactory epithelium is key for regenerating cells important for smell.

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image: Fish Smell ATP to Find Food

Fish Smell ATP to Find Food

By Sandhya Sekar | September 1, 2017

Sensory neurons in the tip of the zebrafish nose respond to molecular signals released from food sources.

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image: How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

How Immune Receptors Got into Mouse Noses

By Shawna Williams | September 1, 2017

A study traces proteins’ evolution from the immune to the olfactory system.

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image: Olfaction Determines Weight in Mice

Olfaction Determines Weight in Mice

By Diana Kwon | July 5, 2017

Animals lacking a sense of smell stayed thinner than their smelling counterparts, despite eating the same amount.

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image: Image of the Day: Smell You Later

Image of the Day: Smell You Later

By The Scientist Staff | May 15, 2017

Adult olfactory stem cells can be used to grow a smattering of cells important for smell, including scent-sniffing neurons and structurally supportive sustentacular cells. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By Diana Kwon | May 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Jason Castro Tackles Olfactory Mysteries

Jason Castro Tackles Olfactory Mysteries

By Ben Andrew Henry | November 1, 2016

Assistant Professor, Bates College. Age: 37

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Male mice exposed to females, their urine, or a chemical in their urine lost sensory neurons in their vomeronasal organs that respond to that chemical.

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