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image: Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

By | June 1, 2017

Parallel evolution in jaws and teeth helped early mammals diversify their diets.

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image: Infographic: Plastic Pollution

Infographic: Plastic Pollution

By | June 1, 2017

Both macroplastic items, such as bags, bottles, and other packaging, and products containing micro- and nanoplastic particles—from cosmetics to paints—contaminate the Earth’s ecosystems.

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image: Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

By | June 1, 2017

Lab studies suggest that plastic pollutants in the environment could have detrimental effects on animals’ physiology.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Pervade Water and Land

Plastic Pollutants Pervade Water and Land

By | June 1, 2017

Contamination of marine and terrestrial ecosystems by microplastics is putting individual organisms at risk.

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image: Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

By | May 26, 2017

Two previously overlooked archaeal strains fill an evolutionary gap for microbes.

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image: Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself

By | May 24, 2017

A fish created by spontaneous androgenesis is the first known vertebrate to arise naturally by this asexual reproductive phenomenon. 

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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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New research provides evidence that the ancient hominin species might not be so ancient after all.

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The infamous "Baby Louie" embryo is a giant oviraptorosaur fossil from China that resembled a gargantuan bird.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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