The Scientist

» music and disease/medicine

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image: Dancing with the Science Stars

Dancing with the Science Stars

By | March 1, 2017

Watch Profilee Erich Jarvis salsa dancing with a professional company.

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image: From Cricket Choruses to <em>Drosophila</em> Calls

From Cricket Choruses to Drosophila Calls

By | March 1, 2017

A handful of insect species communicate using auditory signals—sounds that researchers have dubbed “song.”

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image: Meeting BRAMS

Meeting BRAMS

By | March 1, 2017

Visit the International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research, located in Montreal, to see the research seeking to decipher humans’ relationship to music.

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image: The Mystery of Whale Song

The Mystery of Whale Song

By | March 1, 2017

Structured whale songs are shared by group members and evolve over time, but the calls’ functions are still unclear.

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image: Fish Use a Variety of Sounds to Communicate

Fish Use a Variety of Sounds to Communicate

By | March 1, 2017

Many fish species click, grunt, growl, grumble, or hum—but is it music?

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image: Song of Ourselves

Song of Ourselves

By | March 1, 2017

“Nature’s melodies” may be a human construct that says more about us than about the musicality of other animals.

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image: Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

By | February 8, 2017

Researchers employ an engineered microbe to destroy tumor cells in mice.

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image: Regulators OK Clinical Trials Using Donor Stem Cells

Regulators OK Clinical Trials Using Donor Stem Cells

By | February 6, 2017

Japanese health officials approve human experiments to treat macular degeneration with a cell therapy derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

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image: Pharma Cooperates to Achieve Precision Medicine

Pharma Cooperates to Achieve Precision Medicine

By | February 1, 2017

The challenges of adapting drug development to the age of personalized therapies encourage collaboration among industry players.

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image: May the Force Be with You

May the Force Be with You

By | February 1, 2017

The dissection of how cells sense and propagate physical forces is leading to exciting new tools and discoveries in mechanobiology and mechanomedicine.

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