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image: Fat Cells Travel to Heal Wounds in Flies

Fat Cells Travel to Heal Wounds in Flies

By Kerry Grens | February 28, 2018

Previously considered immobile, these cells swoop in to seal epithelial holes and clean up cellular detritus.  


image: Nobel Prize–Winning Biologist Dies

Nobel Prize–Winning Biologist Dies

By Catherine Offord | February 20, 2018

Günter Blobel, known for his work on the signal hypothesis of protein targeting, has died from cancer at age 81.

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image: Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

Stem Cell Vaccine Protects Mice From Cancer

By Ruth Williams | February 15, 2018

Stem cells and cancer cells have enough molecular similarities that the former can be used to trigger immunity against the latter.

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Poecilia formosa, an all-female fish species, has a surprisingly robust genome. 

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Researchers create a program that can use fMRI data to identify which musical pieces are in participants' heads.  


image: Researchers Catalog Earth’s Microbiome

Researchers Catalog Earth’s Microbiome

By Katarina Zimmer | February 1, 2018

The new database includes data from 27,000 samples collected at sites ranging from Alaskan permafrost to the ocean floor.


Puerto Rico’s Cayo Santiago has hosted decades of research in cognition, primatology, immunization, and other areas.


Pectin fragments may signal plant cells to maintain a type of growth suited to darkness.


image: Image of the Day: Red-Hot Mitochondria

Image of the Day: Red-Hot Mitochondria

By The Scientist Staff | January 29, 2018

Mitochondria may sustain temperatures more than 10 °C warmer than human cells, say researchers. 


The findings more than double the number of known defense mechanisms, piquing the interests of molecular biology tool developers.


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