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image: <em>Vibrio</em> Infections On the Rise

Vibrio Infections On the Rise

By | August 9, 2016

Increases in oceanic populations of these bacteria—both pathogenic and not—is an effect of climate change, scientists show.

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image: Antibiotic Resistance Reaches Brazil

Antibiotic Resistance Reaches Brazil

By | August 8, 2016

Scientists detect a colistin-resistance gene in a clinical sample.

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Access to data from thousands of genotyping customers helped scientists detect novel associations with the disorder across the genome.

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image: Bacterial Baddies

Bacterial Baddies

By | August 1, 2016

Scientist to Watch Cullen Buie, MIT researcher, talks about his quest to devise a method for quickly determining the pathogenicity of microbes.

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From sequencing bacteriophages to synthesizing bacterial genomes to defining a minimal genome

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image: Cullen Buie Parses Pathogens With Passion

Cullen Buie Parses Pathogens With Passion

By | August 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT. Age: 34

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image: How to Build Bioinformatic Pipelines Using Galaxy

How to Build Bioinformatic Pipelines Using Galaxy

By | August 1, 2016

A point-and-click interface alternative to command-line tools that allows researchers to easily create, run, and troubleshoot serial sequence analyses

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image: Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

By | August 1, 2016

In mice, immune cells from the body cavity surrounding organs arrive at the site of damage to chew up the nuclei of dead cells.

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image: Moving Toward Personalized Autism Treatment

Moving Toward Personalized Autism Treatment

By | August 1, 2016

Researchers aim to leverage new insights into the underlying causes of the disorder to better help patients. 

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image: Nailing Down HAR Function

Nailing Down HAR Function

By | August 1, 2016

A remaining challenge in the study of human accelerated regions (HARs) is establishing their specific functions during development and other biological processes.

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