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image: Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

By | October 1, 2017

Emerging infections provide clues about how pathogens might evolve when farm animals are protected from infection.

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image: Infographic: Evolving Virulence

Infographic: Evolving Virulence

By | October 1, 2017

Tracking the myxoma virus in the wild rabbit populations of Australia has yielded insight into how pathogens and their hosts evolve.

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image: Does Farming Drive Fish Disease?

Does Farming Drive Fish Disease?

By | April 19, 2017

Intensive aquaculture favors increasingly virulent forms of certain fish-infecting parasites and pathogens, studies show.

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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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image: <em>Vibrio</em> Infections On the Rise

Vibrio Infections On the Rise

By | August 9, 2016

Increases in oceanic populations of these bacteria—both pathogenic and not—is an effect of climate change, scientists show.

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image: Bacterial Baddies

Bacterial Baddies

By | August 1, 2016

Scientist to Watch Cullen Buie, MIT researcher, talks about his quest to devise a method for quickly determining the pathogenicity of microbes.

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image: Cullen Buie Parses Pathogens With Passion

Cullen Buie Parses Pathogens With Passion

By | August 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT. Age: 34

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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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image: Widespread Plant Immune Tactics

Widespread Plant Immune Tactics

By | February 22, 2016

A survey of plant genomes reveals how different species trick pathogens into triggering their immune defenses.

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image: Premature Assault?

Premature Assault?

By | February 9, 2016

Plants may trick bacteria into attacking before the microbial population reaches a critical size, allowing the plants to successfully defend the weak invasion.

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