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image: Large Carnivores Under Siege

Large Carnivores Under Siege

By | January 13, 2014

As populations of top predators decline in ecosystems the world over, researchers chart the widespread effects.

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image: First North American H5N1 Death

First North American H5N1 Death

By | January 9, 2014

A person in Canada has died of the first confirmed human case of H5N1 avian flu in North America.

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image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.

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image: Schizophrenia’s Jumping Genetics

Schizophrenia’s Jumping Genetics

By | January 6, 2014

Researchers find evidence that transposable elements, also known as jumping genes, may contribute to the development of the psychiatric disorder.

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image: A Ribbeting Tale

A Ribbeting Tale

By | January 1, 2014

A famous frog-hopping contest yields data that challenge previous lab estimates of how far a bullfrog can jump.

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

By | January 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “The Green Web,” author Alan de Queiroz describes the evolutionary journey taken by a South American species of sundew plant.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2014

Are Dolphins Really Smart?, Newton's Football, Outsider Scientists, and We Are Our Brains

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image: Drawn to Controversy

Drawn to Controversy

By | January 1, 2014

By digging through dusty storerooms and reading dead people’s mail, science historian and philosopher Michael Dietrich keeps biologists attuned to the past and mindful of the present.

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image: Elder Pharmacology

Elder Pharmacology

By | January 1, 2014

Studying and treating the chronic diseases associated with aging needs serious revamping.

5 Comments

image: Evolution’s Stowaways

Evolution’s Stowaways

By | January 1, 2014

Terrestrial mammals, carnivorous plants, and even burrowing reptiles have spread around the globe by braving the seven seas. These chance ocean crossings are rewriting the story of Earth’s biogeography.

2 Comments

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