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The dolphins and their trainers will search for the endangered porpoises and enclose them in a protected pen.

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image: How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

By | October 6, 2017

Studies suggest not all critters fare well in extreme weather, though some thrive.

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image: Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

By | October 3, 2017

In Fragile X syndrome—a genetic mishap that results in cognitive delays—the lack of a translation-repressing protein leads to the rampant accumulation of other proteins in the mouse brain.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By | October 1, 2017

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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image: Watch This Biofilm

Watch This Biofilm

By | October 1, 2017

Researchers encoded moving images in DNA within living cells.

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image: Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

By | October 1, 2017

In addition to circulating in the blood as immune sentinels, macrophages play specialized roles in different organs around the body.

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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Rise of the Necrofauna</em>

Book Excerpt from Rise of the Necrofauna

By | October 1, 2017

In chapter 4, “Why Recreate the Woolly Mammoth?” author Britt Wray explores the social consequences of bringing an iconic species back from extinction.

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image: Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

By | September 28, 2017

Marine species survived rafting thousands of kilometers on debris swept into the water by the giant wave, scientists say.

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image: Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

Water Level in a Cell Can Determine Its Fate

By | September 27, 2017

Adding or removing water changes how stem cells differentiate.

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