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image: Nonviral CRISPR Delivery a Success

Nonviral CRISPR Delivery a Success

By | October 2, 2017

Researchers use gold nanoparticles to deliver CRISPR-Cas9 and correct a point mutation in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. 

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image: Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

By | October 2, 2017

The award in Physiology or Medicine goes to chronobiologists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young.

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image: Image of the Day: A Shrimp and a Cockroach

Image of the Day: A Shrimp and a Cockroach

By | October 2, 2017

In the mantis shrimp brain, scientists uncover mushroom bodies—learning and memory structures typically found in the brains of insects. 

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Researchers explore genetic engineering to produce super-tough fibers.

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Researchers suggest that the receptors can control early labor contractions.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Damage Patroller

Damage Patroller

By | October 1, 2017

Stephen Elledge has built a career studying how eukaryotic cells maintain genomic integrity.

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The 38-year-old synthetic biologist comes from a long line of tinkerers and engineers.

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image: Introducing Batman

Introducing Batman

By | October 1, 2017

Daniel Kish, who is blind, uses vocal clicks to navigate the world by echolocation.

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image: Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

By | October 1, 2017

Researchers find that about a quarter of the immune cells are replaced every year.

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    A genomic interrogation of homosexuality turns up speculative links between genetic elements and sexual orientation, but researchers say the study is too small to be significant. 

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