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image: Memory Aid

Memory Aid

By | August 1, 2011

Editor's Choice in Neuroscience

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image: Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

Ernst Haeckel’s Pedigree of Man, 1874

By | August 1, 2011

After completing his studies in medicine and biology, a restless Ernst Haeckel set off for Italy in 1859 to study art and marine biology. The diversity of life fascinated the 26-year-old Prussian, and in addition to painting landscapes, he spent the

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image: An Unlichenly Pair

An Unlichenly Pair

By | August 1, 2011

A young botanist pays tribute to his mentor by naming a newly discovered, rare species in his honor.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2011

First Life, Radioactivity, Brain Bugs, Life of Earth

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Contributors

August 1, 2011

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2011 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Learning to Become a Tree Hugger

Learning to Become a Tree Hugger

By | August 1, 2011

A guide to free software for constructing and assessing species relationships

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image: The First Plant Interactome

The First Plant Interactome

By | July 28, 2011

Protein interaction networks in Arabidopsis give clues to plant evolution and immunity.

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image: On the Origin of Birds

On the Origin of Birds

By | July 27, 2011

The discovery of a new bird-like fossil challenges longstanding theories about which species of dinosaur gave rise to the avian lineage.

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image: Electric Dolphins?

Electric Dolphins?

By | July 27, 2011

Like many fish and amphibians, the Guiana dolphin can sense low levels of electrical activity in the water—an ability not previously reported in true mammals.

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image: Latitude Affects Human Eye Size

Latitude Affects Human Eye Size

By | July 27, 2011

People living near the Earth’s poles, where days are often short and light often low, have larger eyes and visual cortices than those closer to the equator.

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