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Scientist to Watch

By Alison McCook | July 1, 2011

“This is my trophy,” says biologist Michael Edidin, walking across his office at Johns Hopkins University to pick up two oversized clock hands, once part of the stately clock tower that still stands on the Baltimore campus. 

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Speaking of Science

By N/A | July 1, 2011

July 2011's selection of notable quotes

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Trading Pelts for Pestilence

By Jef Akst | July 1, 2011

When European explorers and fishermen began to frequent Canada’s shores in the 16th century, they brought with them a plethora of tools and trinkets, including knives, axes, kettles, and blankets. 

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image: Color by Number Fossils

Color by Number Fossils

By Megan Scudellari | June 30, 2011

Researchers map pigments in early bird fossils using preserved metallic residues.

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Last Day for Salary Survey

By Jef Akst | June 26, 2011

Today is your last chance to participate in our 2011 survey of life science salaries.

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Speaking of Science

By SAMUEL BUTLER | June 24, 2011

June 2011's selection of notable quotes

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Warm-Blooded Dinos?

By Jef Akst | June 24, 2011

Evidence that large dinosaurs had body temperatures similar to modern-day mammals suggests they were either endothermic or extremely good at conserving body heat.

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One Bad Apple

By Richard P. Grant | June 24, 2011

A unique virus and the worm it infects turn up in an orchard outside of Paris.

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Darwin Goes Digital

By Jessica P. Johnson | June 24, 2011

Much of Charles Darwin’s personal library–both his books and what he wrote within them--is now available online.

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image: Escape Predators, Get Parasites

Escape Predators, Get Parasites

By Jef Akst | June 24, 2011

A particular predator defense used by water fleas makes them more susceptible to parasite infections, new research shows.

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