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There is little evidence that full treatment durations discourage the development of drug-resistant bacteria.

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image: Nature Index Identifies Top Contributors to Innovation

Nature Index Identifies Top Contributors to Innovation

By | August 9, 2017

New rankings highlight institutions that have produced large numbers of articles cited in others' patents.

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image: The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

The Ever-Expanding T-Cell World: A Primer

By | August 7, 2017

Researchers continue to identify new T-cell subtypes—and devise ways to use them to fight cancer. The Scientist attempts to catalog them all.

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image: Final Nail Hammered into NgAgo Coffin

Final Nail Hammered into NgAgo Coffin

By | August 3, 2017

The paper describing the gene-editing method is retracted.

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image: Microbiology Professor Wanted for Murder

Microbiology Professor Wanted for Murder

By | August 3, 2017

An arrest warrant has been issued for Wyndham Lathem of Northwestern University in connection with a stabbing death in Chicago.

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The University of California files a brief in its appeal challenging the ruling that the Broad Institute’s group would retain its CRISPR genome-editing patent.

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Another case of HIV remission emerges, this time in a South African girl diagnosed as an infant and disease-free for more than eight years.

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image: Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

Mammalian Immunity: What’s RNAi Got to Do with It?

By | July 21, 2017

A new study adds to the evidence that mammalian cells can use small interfering RNAs to defend against viruses, but questions remain about physiological importance.

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image: Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

Ebola Persistence Documented in Monkeys

By | July 17, 2017

In tissue samples from rhesus macaques, researchers find the virus in the same immune-privileged sites where Ebola has been found to persist in humans.

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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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