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Contributors

By and | May 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2014 issue of The Scientist

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The Skin We’re In

By | May 1, 2014

Beneath maladies of the skin lie psychosocial stigma and pain.

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A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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Neuroaesthetics

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unravel the biology of beauty and art.

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Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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How Artistic Brains Differ

By | April 18, 2014

A study reveals structural differences between the brains of artists and non-artists.

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Patent Covers CRISPR

By | April 17, 2014

The Broad Institute has succeeded in getting the first patent for the hot new genome-editing technique.

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image: Evolutionarily Distinct Birds Ranked

Evolutionarily Distinct Birds Ranked

By | April 11, 2014

Researchers collate a list of the 100 most rare and unique avian species facing extinction.

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Bridging Two Worlds

By | April 4, 2014

Lynne Quarmby’s love of the natural world inspires her to explore beyond her cell biology lab through art.

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image: Lynne Quarmby - Artist

Lynne Quarmby - Artist

By | April 4, 2014

The professor of molecular biology and biochemistry at Simon Fraser University is also an accomplished painter.

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