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image: Radical Reversal

Radical Reversal

By Megan Scudellari | July 6, 2011

Free radicals, widely believed to promote cancer, may actually slow tumor growth.

54 Comments

image: New Suspect in <em>E. coli</em> Deaths

New Suspect in E. coli Deaths

By Jessica P. Johnson | July 6, 2011

Fenugreek seeds are banned in Europe after authorities point the finger at them as a potential source of the deadly E. coli outbreak.

6 Comments

image: Top 7 in Cancer Biology

Top 7 in Cancer Biology

By Bob Grant | July 6, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in cancer biology and related areas, from Faculty of 1000

0 Comments

image: Air Pollution Stunts Cognition

Air Pollution Stunts Cognition

By Tia Ghose | July 6, 2011

Particulates in the air can cause impaired learning and depression in mice.

21 Comments

image: Dead Cane Toads Are Deadly

Dead Cane Toads Are Deadly

By Edyta Zielinska | July 5, 2011

The deadly-when-eaten invasive amphibians that have been plaguing Australian wildlife for years continue to poison even after they’re dead.

9 Comments

image: RNAs regulate cell death

RNAs regulate cell death

By Edyta Zielinska | July 5, 2011

Three RNAs expressed in the nucleolus mediate death in cells exposed to too much fat.

0 Comments

Brain Cells Self-Amplify

By Jef Akst | July 5, 2011

A certain type of neural precursor does it all—replaces itself, differentiates into specialized brain cells, and multiplies into more stem-cell-like cells.

0 Comments

image: Undiagnosed Diseases Overwhelm NIH

Undiagnosed Diseases Overwhelm NIH

By Tia Ghose | July 5, 2011

An NIH program to identify mystery diseases has stopped accepting applications after being flooded with cases.

21 Comments

image: New Target for Myelin Repair

New Target for Myelin Repair

By Tia Ghose | July 4, 2011

Researchers identify a receptor that causes the degeneration of myelin coating around nerve cells, pointing to a potential new therapy for multiple sclerosis patients.

12 Comments

image: How Stress is Inherited

How Stress is Inherited

By Tia Ghose | July 1, 2011

Under stressful conditions, a transcription factor in flies turns on genes by releasing its hold on tightly wound DNA, a new study suggests.

18 Comments

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