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image: Foresight

Foresight

By | July 1, 2011

Studying the earliest events in visual development, Carla Shatz has learned the importance of looking at one’s data with open eyes—and an open mind.

12 Comments

image: Harmit Malik: Viral Historian

Harmit Malik: Viral Historian

By | July 1, 2011

Member, Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington. Age: 38

3 Comments

image: Optogenetics: A Light Switch for Neurons

Optogenetics: A Light Switch for Neurons

By | July 1, 2011

This animation illustrates optogenetics—a radical new technology for controlling brain activity with light. 

0 Comments

image: Color by Number Fossils

Color by Number Fossils

By | June 30, 2011

Researchers map pigments in early bird fossils using preserved metallic residues.

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image: Warm-Blooded Dinos?

Warm-Blooded Dinos?

By | June 24, 2011

Evidence that large dinosaurs had body temperatures similar to modern-day mammals suggests they were either endothermic or extremely good at conserving body heat.

3 Comments

image: Escape Predators, Get Parasites

Escape Predators, Get Parasites

By | June 24, 2011

A particular predator defense used by water fleas makes them more susceptible to parasite infections, new research shows.

0 Comments

image: Sleep on it

Sleep on it

By | June 23, 2011

Scientists invent a method to control the timing and duration of sleep in fruit flies and find that snoozing helps form long-term memories.

9 Comments

image: Behavior brief

Behavior brief

By | June 23, 2011

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research.

0 Comments

image: Summit Science

Summit Science

By | June 20, 2011

Researchers seeking a link between vision problems and the dangerous physiological effects of hypoxia in mountain climbers are taking their work to new heights.

6 Comments

image: Head trauma in the funny pages

Head trauma in the funny pages

By | June 17, 2011

Researchers are using real-world methods to study traumatic brain injuries in a comic book.

0 Comments

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