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The Scientist

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image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By Abby Olena | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By Tracy Vence | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: Cancer Pioneer Dies

Cancer Pioneer Dies

By Jef Akst | December 20, 2013

Janet Rowley, who earned fame for linking chromosomal abnormalities to cancer in the 1970s, has passed away at age 88 from ovarian cancer.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By Anna Azvolinsky | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By Abby Olena | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By Tracy Vence | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By Sabrina Richards | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

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image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By Jef Akst | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

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image: Nailing Regeneration

Nailing Regeneration

By Sabrina Richards | June 12, 2013

Researchers identify the signaling program that enables finger and toenail stem cells to direct digit regeneration after amputation.

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image: Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

By Kate Yandell | June 7, 2013

In avian species, a gene induces programmed cell death during development in the area where a phallus would otherwise grow.

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