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» Mars Rover, immunology and culture

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The artist discusses music as a means to get kids excited about science, and the inspiration he took from astrophysics and polar bears.

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image: U.S. Withdraws from UNESCO

U.S. Withdraws from UNESCO

By Catherine Offord | October 12, 2017

The decision to leave the United Nations’ educational, scientific, and cultural agency was spurred by what American officials say is the organization’s anti-Israel bias and lack of commitment to reform.

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image: Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Brain

Image of the Day: Lab-Grown Brain

By The Scientist Staff | October 12, 2017

Scientists grew organoids that mimic human fetal brains and infected them with the Zika virus to model its neurological effects.

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image: Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

By Shawna Williams | October 1, 2017

Researchers find that about a quarter of the immune cells are replaced every year.

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image: Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

By The Scientist Staff | October 1, 2017

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

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image: Watch This Biofilm

Watch This Biofilm

By The Scientist Staff | October 1, 2017

Researchers encoded moving images in DNA within living cells.

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image: Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

Infographic: Macrophages Around the Body

By Claire Asher | October 1, 2017

In addition to circulating in the blood as immune sentinels, macrophages play specialized roles in different organs around the body.

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image: Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

Macrophages Are the Ultimate Multitaskers

By Claire Asher | October 1, 2017

From guiding branching neurons in the developing brain to maintaining a healthy heartbeat, there seems to be no job that the immune cells can’t tackle.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Rise of the Necrofauna</em>

Book Excerpt from Rise of the Necrofauna

By Britt Wray | October 1, 2017

In chapter 4, “Why Recreate the Woolly Mammoth?” author Britt Wray explores the social consequences of bringing an iconic species back from extinction.

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image: Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

Booger Bacteria’s Sweet Immune Suppression

By Ruth Williams | September 6, 2017

Sweet taste receptor-activating molecules produced by sinus microbes suppress the local innate immune system in humans.

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