The Scientist

» mountain pine beetle, ecology and immunology

Most Recent

image: Breast Milk Programs Memory Skills

Breast Milk Programs Memory Skills

By Ed Yong | December 1, 2013

Mouse mothers can improve their pups’ memories by altering levels of immune chemicals in their milk.


image: Biology's Coefficient

Biology's Coefficient

By Megan Scudellari | December 1, 2013

Joel Cohen uses the tools of mathematics to deconstruct questions of life.


image: Waiting in the Wings

Waiting in the Wings

By Erin Weeks | December 1, 2013

A century’s worth of collected butterflies shed light on how climate change threatens the survival of early-emerging species.

1 Comment

image: Top 10 Innovations 2013

Top 10 Innovations 2013

By The Scientist Staff | December 1, 2013

The Scientist’s annual competition uncovered a bonanza of interesting technologies that made their way onto the market and into labs this year.

1 Comment

image: Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

By Bob Grant | November 26, 2013

The state assembles a task force to try to slow the growth of burgeoning populations of the ecologically destructive invasive species.


image: Antifungal Permits Flu?

Antifungal Permits Flu?

By Jef Akst | November 21, 2013

A common fungus-fighting drug increases the susceptibility of mice to influenza infections.


image: Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

By Tracy Vence | November 21, 2013

Germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice fare worse than those with rich gut microbiomes during cancer treatment, two studies show.


image: HIV’s Stealth Revealed

HIV’s Stealth Revealed

By Ed Yong | November 21, 2013

HIV-1 evades the immune system with a protein shield, which can be lifted.


image: T cells and Transplantation

T cells and Transplantation

By Ruth Williams | November 13, 2013

Drug-resistant immune cells protect patients from graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplant.


image: Time for T cells

Time for T cells

By Ruth Williams | November 7, 2013

Circadian rhythms control the development of inflammatory T cells, while jet lag sends their production into overdrive.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Could Rapamycin Help Humans Live Longer?
  2. Renowned Physicist Stephen Hawking Dies
  3. John Sulston, Human Genome Project Leader, Dies
  4. High-Fiber Diet Shifts Gut Microbes, Lowering Blood Sugar in Diabetics