The Scientist

» sexual reproduction and ecology

Most Recent

image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

0 Comments

image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

0 Comments

image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

0 Comments

image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

0 Comments

image: Laugh, Then Think: The Ig Nobels

Laugh, Then Think: The Ig Nobels

By | September 21, 2015

This year’s awards honor research on bee stings, appendicitis, kissing, and more.

0 Comments

image: Fending Off Infection in Future Generations

Fending Off Infection in Future Generations

By | August 17, 2015

Female fruit flies challenged with infection during their lifetimes have offspring with greater genetic diversity.

0 Comments

image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

5 Comments

image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

0 Comments

image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

0 Comments

image: How to Make a New Species

How to Make a New Species

By | July 1, 2015

Scientists mutate a mating pheromone and its corresponding receptor in yeast to promote speciation.

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. 2017 Top 10 Innovations
    Features 2017 Top 10 Innovations

    From single-cell analysis to whole-genome sequencing, this year’s best new products shine on many levels.

  2. Thousands of Mutations Accumulate in the Human Brain Over a Lifetime
  3. Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age
    News Analysis Antiviral Immunotherapy Comes of Age

    T-cell therapies are not just for cancer. Researchers are also advancing immunotherapy methods to protect bone marrow transplant patients from viral infections. 

  4. The Rising Research Profile of 23andMe
    News Analysis The Rising Research Profile of 23andMe

    An exploration of the genetics of earlobe attachment is just the latest collaborative research project to come out of the personal genetic testing company.

FreeShip