The Scientist

» sexual orientation, microbiology and evolution

Most Recent

image: Microbiome Teams Up Against <em>C. diff</em>

Microbiome Teams Up Against C. diff

By Jef Akst | July 14, 2015

Researchers build a mathematical model that can predict whether a mouse will be infected by Clostridium difficile based on the microbes found in its GI tract.

1 Comment

image: Evolution of Kin Discrimination

Evolution of Kin Discrimination

By Ashley P. Taylor | July 6, 2015

A bacterium’s ability to distinguish self from non-self can arise spontaneously, a study shows, reigniting questions of whether the trait can be considered an adaptation.


image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By The Scientist Staff | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.


image: High-Flying Ducks

High-Flying Ducks

By Sarah Hewitt | July 1, 2015

Five species of waterfowl have evolved a variety of adaptations to adjust to the high altitude of South America’s Lake Titicaca.

1 Comment

image: How to Make a New Species

How to Make a New Species

By Ruth Williams | July 1, 2015

Scientists mutate a mating pheromone and its corresponding receptor in yeast to promote speciation.


image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By Anna Azvolinsky | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.


image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By The Scientist Staff | July 1, 2015

July 2015's selection of notable quotes


image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By Jenny Rood | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

1 Comment

image: The Sum of Our Parts

The Sum of Our Parts

By Janice Dietert and Rodney Dietert | July 1, 2015

Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.


image: Roos Are Mainly South Paws

Roos Are Mainly South Paws

By Bob Grant | June 22, 2015

A new study shows that kangaroos are predominantly left-handed.


Popular Now

  1. Could Rapamycin Help Humans Live Longer?
  2. Renowned Physicist Stephen Hawking Dies
  3. John Sulston, Human Genome Project Leader, Dies
  4. High-Fiber Diet Shifts Gut Microbes, Lowering Blood Sugar in Diabetics