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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Jane on the Brain</em>

Book Excerpt from Jane on the Brain

By Wendy Jones | December 1, 2017

In chapter 3, “The Sense of Sensibility,” author Wendy Jones uses scenes from one of Jane Austen’s most celebrated novels to illustrate the functioning of the body’s stress response system.

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image: Captivated by Chromosomes

Captivated by Chromosomes

By Anna Azvolinsky | December 1, 2017

Peering through a microscope since age 14, Joseph Gall, now 89, still sees wonder at the other end.

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Aggressive little marine predators, mantis shrimps possess a mushroom body that appears identical to the one found in insects.

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image: Sense, Sensibility, and Neuroscience

Sense, Sensibility, and Neuroscience

By Wendy Jones | December 1, 2017

Jane Austen can teach us a lot about how our brains handle uncertainty.

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The switch from maternal factors involves dynamic reprogramming of the zygotic genome.

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New technologies reveal the dynamic changes in mouse and human embryos during the first week after fertilization.

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image: The Rising Research Profile of 23andMe

The Rising Research Profile of 23andMe

By Catherine Offord | December 1, 2017

An exploration of the genetics of earlobe attachment is just the latest collaborative research project to come out of the personal genetic testing company.

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image: Six-Letter DNA Alphabet Produces Proteins in Cells

Six-Letter DNA Alphabet Produces Proteins in Cells

By Ruth Williams | November 29, 2017

Transcription and translation of DNA containing synthetic base pairs becomes a reality in living cells.

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image: Man Receives First In Vivo Gene-Editing Therapy

Man Receives First In Vivo Gene-Editing Therapy

By Kerry Grens | November 15, 2017

The 44-year-old patient has Hunter syndrome, which doctors hope to treat using zinc finger nucleases.

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New techniques for activating or suppressing neural activity by zapping the skull’s surface allow researchers to target smaller and deeper areas of the brain.

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