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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

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image: Science Your Plants!

Science Your Plants!

By | February 1, 2017

CalTech researcher Elliot Meyerowitz describes how plant genetics influences growth and productivity.

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Children born to obese parents are at increased risk of failing motor development and cognitive tests, according to an NIH-led study.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Testosterone Rex</em>

Book Excerpt from Testosterone Rex

By | January 1, 2017

In Chapter 6, “The Hormonal Essence of the T-Rex?” author Cordelia Fine considers the biological dogma that testes, and the powerful hormones they exude, are the root of all sexual inequality.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Gene Drives and Other Controversies

Gene Drives and Other Controversies

By | January 1, 2017

Aedes and Anopheles control; three-parent babies; the PhD glut

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | January 1, 2017

Science under Trump, gene drive, medical marijuana, and more

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image: Using Gene Drives to Limit the Spread of Malaria

Using Gene Drives to Limit the Spread of Malaria

By | January 1, 2017

Introducing genetic changes into mosquito populations could be key to effective malaria control.

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image: Infographic: Using Gene Drive to Control Malaria

Infographic: Using Gene Drive to Control Malaria

By | January 1, 2017

For years, researchers have looked to genetically modify mosquitoes to prevent the spread of malaria. Now they have a promising strategy.

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