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image: Infographic: Antibody Cancer Therapy

Infographic: Antibody Cancer Therapy

By | April 1, 2017

An experimental technique removes T cells that aid in vitro tumor growth.

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image: Infographic: Targeting Cancer Antigens

Infographic: Targeting Cancer Antigens

By | April 1, 2017

Neoantigens may serve as valuable targets for new immunotherapies.

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image: Targeting Tregs Halts Cancer’s Immune Helpers

Targeting Tregs Halts Cancer’s Immune Helpers

By | April 1, 2017

New monoclonal antibodies kill both cancer-promoting immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in culture.

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image: Tasmanian Devil Cancer Immunotherapy

Tasmanian Devil Cancer Immunotherapy

By | March 13, 2017

Researchers in Australia claim to have successfully used immunotherapy to treat devil facial tumor disease.

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image: Kite’s CAR T-Cell Therapy Success

Kite’s CAR T-Cell Therapy Success

By | March 1, 2017

More than one-third of lymphoma patients in a Phase 2 trial were clear of disease at six months, and no new safety concerns arose since the company’s three-month follow up.

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image: HIV Vaccines May Help Tamp Down Virus

HIV Vaccines May Help Tamp Down Virus

By | February 24, 2017

A fraction of HIV patients in a small, uncontrolled study were able to stop antiretroviral therapy after receiving the immune boosters.

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image: Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

By | February 8, 2017

Researchers employ an engineered microbe to destroy tumor cells in mice.

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New approaches to treating cancer have shown great promise, but they also come with serious risks that give us cause for concern.

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An early-stage study of the effectiveness of a lung-cancer vaccine developed by scientists in Cuba could start as early as next month.

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image: Cuban-U.S. Research Collaborations Easier Now

Cuban-U.S. Research Collaborations Easier Now

By | October 18, 2016

President Obama’s executive actions remove some of the red tape for American and Cuban scientists to work together.

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