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image: Week in Review: January 27–31

Week in Review: January 27–31

By | January 31, 2014

Stimulus-triggered pluripotency; antioxidants speed lung tumor growth; the importance of seminal vesicles; how a plant pathogen jumps hosts

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image: Review: “Green Porno”

Review: “Green Porno”

By | January 29, 2014

Isabella Rossellini explores nature’s kinky side in a one-woman show.

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image: New Method for Reprogramming Cells

New Method for Reprogramming Cells

By | January 29, 2014

An external stressor, such as low pH or a mechanical squeeze, can send differentiated mouse cells back to a pluripotent state.

4 Comments

image: NIH Tackles Irreproducibility

NIH Tackles Irreproducibility

By | January 28, 2014

The federal agency speaks out about how to improve the quality of scientific research.

5 Comments

image: Not So New?

Not So New?

By | January 20, 2014

A paper presenting a tool for visualization of large datasets has left several scientists wondering how such “quilt plots” justified journal publication.

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image: Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

By | January 16, 2014

A pair of one-act chamber operas takes the audience inside the world of imagined sound. 

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image: A Ribbeting Tale

A Ribbeting Tale

By | January 1, 2014

A famous frog-hopping contest yields data that challenge previous lab estimates of how far a bullfrog can jump.

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image: Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

By | January 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “The Green Web,” author Alan de Queiroz describes the evolutionary journey taken by a South American species of sundew plant.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2014

Are Dolphins Really Smart?, Newton's Football, Outsider Scientists, and We Are Our Brains

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image: Evolution’s Stowaways

Evolution’s Stowaways

By | January 1, 2014

Terrestrial mammals, carnivorous plants, and even burrowing reptiles have spread around the globe by braving the seven seas. These chance ocean crossings are rewriting the story of Earth’s biogeography.

2 Comments

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