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Contributors

By and | May 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Copper Stopper

Copper Stopper

By | May 1, 2016

This research found that coating hospital surfaces with copper helped battle microbes and the infections they spread.

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image: Nanotechnology Could Conquer Hospital-Acquired Infections

Nanotechnology Could Conquer Hospital-Acquired Infections

By | May 1, 2016

Metal ions and materials with nanoscale patterns can kill even antibiotic-resistant pathogens. 

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Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2016

May 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Global Science Era

The Global Science Era

By | May 1, 2016

As international collaboration becomes increasingly common, researchers must work to limit their own biases and let cultural diversity enhance their work.

2 Comments

image: Nanoscale Defenses

Nanoscale Defenses

By | May 1, 2016

Coating hospital surfaces, surgical equipment, patient implants, and water-delivery systems with nanoscale patterns and particles could curb the rise of hospital-acquired infections.

2 Comments

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The Zombie Literature

By | May 1, 2016

Retractions are on the rise. But reams of flawed research papers persist in the scientific literature. Is it time to change the way papers are published?

9 Comments

image: To Each Animal Its Own Cognition

To Each Animal Its Own Cognition

By | May 1, 2016

The study of nonhuman intelligence is coming into its own as researchers realize the unique contexts in which distinct species learn and behave.

3 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2016

Lab Girl, The Most Perfect Thing, Half-Earth, and Cosmosapiens

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