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The Scientist

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image: Image of the Day: Nanobot Schematic

Image of the Day: Nanobot Schematic

By The Scientist Staff | April 13, 2018

A magnetically controlled device could have applications in studies of cell biology and biophysics.

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image: Image of the Day: Colorful Butterfly-Bot

Image of the Day: Colorful Butterfly-Bot

By The Scientist Staff | April 5, 2018

Scientists engineered biomaterials similar to those chameleons use to change color and applied them to a robot.

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image: Image of the Day: New Neurons

Image of the Day: New Neurons

By The Scientist Staff | March 28, 2018

Scientists discover a molecular factor that allows them to follow neurons from birth to maturity.

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image: Tadpoles Keep Eating Because They Don’t Feel Full

Tadpoles Keep Eating Because They Don’t Feel Full

By Catherine Offord | March 28, 2018

Baby frogs don’t develop the neural circuitry responsible for feeding inhibition until they begin metamorphosing into adults. 

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image: Image of the Day: Morphing Cells

Image of the Day: Morphing Cells

By The Scientist Staff | March 27, 2018

By removing a single gene, researchers change the developmental fate of tumor cells in mice.  

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image: Image of the Day: 3-D Nanofibers

Image of the Day: 3-D Nanofibers

By The Scientist Staff | March 7, 2018

Researchers created a nanofibrous scaffold to see how it supports cell growth.

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Research into the biological basis of gender identity is in its infancy, but clues are beginning to emerge.

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image: Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagy’s Role in Health and Disease

Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagy’s Role in Health and Disease

By Vikramjit Lahiri and Daniel J. Klionsky | March 1, 2018

New details of the molecular process by which our cells consume themselves point to therapeutic potential.

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image: DNA Robots Target Cancer

DNA Robots Target Cancer

By Abby Olena | February 12, 2018

Researchers use DNA origami to generate tiny mechanical devices that deliver a drug that cuts off the blood supply to tumors in mice.

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image: Primitive Human Eggs Grown to Full Maturity in the Lab

Primitive Human Eggs Grown to Full Maturity in the Lab

By Ashley Yeager | February 9, 2018

The technique could combat infertility, but it's still not clear whether these eggs are normal and functional.

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