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» language processing and ecology

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image: Jungle Field Trip

Jungle Field Trip

By | December 1, 2015

Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.

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image: Urban Owl-Fitters

Urban Owl-Fitters

By | December 1, 2015

How birds with an innate propensity for living among humans are establishing populations in cities

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image: Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

Spiders, Prey Leave DNA

By | November 30, 2015

A study of black widow spiders suggests that the arachnids leave traces of their own genetic material and DNA from prey in their sticky webs.

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | October 20, 2015

Caffeinated nectar makes bees more loyal to a food source, even when foraging there is suboptimal.

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image: One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

One-Third of Cactus Species Threatened

By | October 6, 2015

A global assessment of declining cacti populations places responsibility on increasing human activities.

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image: Lefties, Language, and Lateralization

Lefties, Language, and Lateralization

By | October 1, 2015

The long-sought genetic link between handedness and language lateralization patterns in the brain is turning out to be illusory.

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image: Special Delivery

Special Delivery

By | October 1, 2015

Neurons in new brains and old

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image: Whistle Stop

Whistle Stop

By | October 1, 2015

Visit the remote Turkish village where the musical language that residents use to communicate across valleys is elucidating how language is processed in the brain.

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image: Whistle While You Work Your Brain

Whistle While You Work Your Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Communication based on whistles offers a “natural experiment” for studying how the brain processes language.

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image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

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