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image: The Last Vaccine Frontier

The Last Vaccine Frontier

By Brad Spellberg | June 1, 2011

Successful vaccines have been created to protect against pathogenic bacteria and viruses. Why aren’t there any for combating fungal infections?

3 Comments

image: Recognizing the Human Potential

Recognizing the Human Potential

By Gene M. Shearer and Adriano Boasso | June 1, 2011

It may be time to reconsider an AIDS vaccine which is more human than viral, triggering the immune system in a way that no other vaccine does.

12 Comments

image: Shooting Down Addiction

Shooting Down Addiction

By Thomas Kosten | June 1, 2011

A new breed of vaccines aims to wean users off cocaine.

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image: A Shot in the Arm

A Shot in the Arm

By Edyta Zielinska | June 1, 2011

Decades of vaccine research have expanded our understanding of the immune system and are yielding novel disease-fighting tactics.

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image: Compact Model T

Compact Model T

By Hannah Waters | May 25, 2011

Editor's choice in immunology

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image: Imagining a Cure

Imagining a Cure

By Nicholas P. Restifo and Megan Bachinski | April 11, 2011

For cancer patients, close is not good enough.

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image: Viral Hijackers

Viral Hijackers

By Hannah Waters | April 1, 2011

Editor's choice in immunology

0 Comments

image: Family Affair

Family Affair

By Megan Scudellari | April 1, 2011

In discovering their shared ancestry, a distantly related animal geneticist and plant pathologist find a common thread in their work on immune receptors.

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image: Where Cancer and Inflammation Intersect

Where Cancer and Inflammation Intersect

By Giorgio Trinchieri | April 1, 2011

Recent clinical trials have reignited the interest in simple anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin for controlling the inflammation associated with cancer. 

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image: An Aspirin for your Cancer?

An Aspirin for your Cancer?

By Giorgio Trinchieri | April 1, 2011

Can tumors—which can originate from, and often resemble, chronically inflamed tissue—be curtailed using familiar anti-inflammatory agents, without their side effects?

0 Comments

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