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image: Beyond Expectation

Beyond Expectation

By Karen Hopkin | September 1, 2011

Philippa “Pippa” Marrack has made some unanticipated discoveries about how the immune system functions in health and disease.

9 Comments

image: Speak, RNA

Speak, RNA

By Jeffrey M. Perkel | September 1, 2011

A trip through the transcriptome

0 Comments

image: Piggyback Pathogen

Piggyback Pathogen

By Jessica P. Johnson | September 1, 2011

Editor’s Choice in Immunology

0 Comments

image: The Cytokine Cycle

The Cytokine Cycle

By W. Sue T. Griffin | September 1, 2011

The initiating cause of Alzheimer’s disease is still unknown. However, from our studies it’s clear that many types of neuronal damage—­­from traumatic brain injury, to epilepsy, infection, or genetic predisposition—­can activate brain immune cells—microglia and astrocytes-- promoting them to produce IL-1 and S100 inflammatory cytokines.

12 Comments

image: Blood’s Role in the Aging Brain

Blood’s Role in the Aging Brain

By Edyta Zielinska | August 31, 2011

A blood protein involved in allergy contributes to the decline in brain function and memory in aging mice.

18 Comments

image: Velcro Helps Muscles Grow

Velcro Helps Muscles Grow

By Edyta Zielinska | August 31, 2011

Stretching muscle cells as they grow helps promote the expression of growth factors.

6 Comments

image: Hiding Under a Cap

Hiding Under a Cap

By Richard P. Grant | August 30, 2011

Editor's Choice in Immunology

0 Comments

image: Black Death Pathogen Extinct?

Black Death Pathogen Extinct?

By Tia Ghose | August 29, 2011

The Yersinia pestis strain extracted from the bones of Black Death victims may no longer exist.

3 Comments

image: Beer Yeast Identified

Beer Yeast Identified

By Jef Akst | August 23, 2011

A new yeast species found in Patagonia appears to be the missing half of the long-used lager yeast.

3 Comments

image: Next Generation: Hundreds of Cell-Analyses at Once

Next Generation: Hundreds of Cell-Analyses at Once

By Edyta Zielinska | August 11, 2011

A new microfluidics chip lets researchers analyze the nucleic acids of 300 individual cells simultaneously.

3 Comments

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