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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Power of Rare</em>

Book Excerpt from The Power of Rare

By Victoria Jackson and Michael Yeaman | May 1, 2018

In chapter 4, “Building a Cure Machine,” author Victoria Jackson reveals the challenges in launching a foundation focused on funding research on a rare disease.

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image: Caught on Camera

Caught on Camera

By The Scientist Staff | May 1, 2018

Selected rare-disease Images of the Day from the-scientist.com

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The flow of calcium and potassium ions keeps muscles contracting in the diaphragms of neonatal mice, but if a key protein receptor is missing, fatigue sets in more quickly.

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Software that can separate signals from noise brings neuroscientists a step closer to understanding neurons’ patterns of communication.

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Research suggests that the invasive, all-female Procambarus virginalis originated in a German aquarium back in the 1990s.

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image: Rare to the Rescue

Rare to the Rescue

By Victoria Jackson and Michael Yeaman | May 1, 2018

Rarity is a strength, not a weakness, when lessons learned from rare disease patients buoy research and development to find cures for more common diseases.

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image: Infographic: Getting Synapses Ready to Fire

Infographic: Getting Synapses Ready to Fire

By Ashley Yeager | May 1, 2018

A new study reveals more about the role of specialized Schwann cells at junctions between neurons and muscle cells.

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image: How Bacteria Eat Penicillin

How Bacteria Eat Penicillin

By Shawna Williams | April 30, 2018

Scientists work out the specific genes and biochemical steps required for digesting the very drugs designed to kill microbes.

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A new technique reveals certain neuronal connections grow larger and denser when memories are made.

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image: Worms’ Magnetic Sense Questioned

Worms’ Magnetic Sense Questioned

By Abby Olena | April 25, 2018

Unsuccessful attempts to reproduce the results of a 2015 study reporting that C. elegans orient themselves by Earth’s magnetic field spark debate among researchers.

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