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image: Flies’ Feet Can Spread Bacteria

Flies’ Feet Can Spread Bacteria

By Kerry Grens | November 27, 2017

Lab experiments and metagenomic analyses of flies’ resident bacteria indicate that the insects carry microbes from place to place on their legs.

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A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 

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Spark Therapeutics’s Luxturna would be the first approved therapy in the U.S. that replaces or repairs a defective gene inherited from one’s parents.

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image: Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

By Mikhail Tikhonov | October 12, 2017

Empirical data and humans’ biased interpretations can only get so far in truly understanding life at the microscale.

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image: Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

By Ashley Yeager | October 11, 2017

Vaginal birth leads to changes in the development of offsprings’ microbiomes not seen among mice born via C-section, which researchers suspect might contribute to the weight differences.

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image: Plague Ravaging Madagascar

Plague Ravaging Madagascar

By Kerry Grens | October 10, 2017

Nearly four dozen people have died.

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Tissue recipients were treated as “guinea pigs,” says investigation leader.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By Aggie Mika | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

By Ashley P. Taylor | September 28, 2017

Embedded within 3.95-billion-year-old rock, scientists have found graphite with a carbon signature that indicates biological activity.

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image: In-Depth Look at the Human Microbiome

In-Depth Look at the Human Microbiome

By Jef Akst | September 20, 2017

Hundreds of samples from microbes living in the gut, skin, mouth, and vagina add to the human microbiome “fingerprint.” 

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