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image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism

2 Comments

image: Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

Boyle’s Monsters, 1665

By | May 1, 2012

From accounts of deformed animals to scratch-and-sniff technology, Robert Boyle's early contributions to the Royal Society of London were prolific and wide ranging.

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image: The Two Faces of Metastasis

The Two Faces of Metastasis

By | April 1, 2012

During development, the cells of an embryo change their pattern of gene expression, which allows them to detach from their original location and migrate to another part of the embryo, where the pattern changes again to allow formation of a new organ.

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image: Are Cancer Stem Cells Ready for Prime Time?

Are Cancer Stem Cells Ready for Prime Time?

By | April 1, 2012

A flood of new discoveries has refined our definition of cancer stem cells. Now it’s up to human clinical trials to test if they can make a difference in patients.

48 Comments

image: How to Make Eyeball Stew

How to Make Eyeball Stew

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in developmental biology

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image: Model Citizen

Model Citizen

By | March 1, 2012

With an eye to understanding animal regeneration, Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado has turned a freshwater planarian into a model system to watch.

2 Comments

image: How Tigers Get Their Stripes

How Tigers Get Their Stripes

By | February 22, 2012

For the first time researchers have demonstrated the molecular tango that gives rise to repeating patterns in developing animal embryos.

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image: Cell Change Up

Cell Change Up

By | February 9, 2012

Imaging cell cytoskeletons during early embryonic development leads researchers to uncover a new regulator of cell shape

3 Comments

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