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Activating genes for reprogramming factors for a short time transforms large numbers of differentiated cells into multipotent forms that could be useful for cell-based therapies.

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image: Image of the Day: Ice Age Horse 

Image of the Day: Ice Age Horse 

By | November 29, 2017

Scientists have identified a new genus of extinct horse that lived in North America during the last ice age. 

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Medical organizations endorse the “Undetectable = Untransmissible” campaign, which aims to raise awareness of scientific evidence showing that virally suppressed people living with HIV cannot infect others.

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The 10-micrometer-long flagellate cell might have a big story to tell about the evolution of eukaryotes.

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image: European Research Council Founder, Molecular Biologist Dies

European Research Council Founder, Molecular Biologist Dies

By | November 20, 2017

Fotis Kafatos, a Greek researcher famous for his work on malaria, has died at age 77.

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image: Cancer Researcher, Former AACR President Dies

Cancer Researcher, Former AACR President Dies

By | November 13, 2017

Donald Coffey, a longtime professor at Johns Hopkins University, discovered the nuclear matrix within cells and its role in DNA replication.

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Single-cell analyses from mouse samples detail the changes in cell distribution during infections.

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Maintaining dynamic connections among the body’s mitochondria is required for the health and life-extending benefits of low-calorie diets for nematodes.

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image: Mass Resignation from <em>Scientific Reports</em>’s Editorial Board

Mass Resignation from Scientific Reports’s Editorial Board

By | November 7, 2017

Nineteen researchers have stepped down after the journal decided not to retract a paper that they say plagiarized the work of a Johns Hopkins biomedical scientist.

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image: Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

Ecologists Welcome Seventh Great Ape Species into Our Family

By | November 2, 2017

The Tapanuli orangutan has been identified as the newest species of great ape, but also likely the most endangered. 

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