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» inflammation and developmental biology

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image: Author Nets Seven Retractions

Author Nets Seven Retractions

By | February 22, 2016

Biochemical Pharmacology pulls papers coauthored by a scientist whose work has been under investigation at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Infection-Autism Link Explained?

Infection-Autism Link Explained?

By | January 31, 2016

A mouse study suggests a mechanism by which severe infections during pregnancy increase autism risk. 

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image: Next Generation: Designer Cells Treat Psoriasis

Next Generation: Designer Cells Treat Psoriasis

By | December 16, 2015

Engineered cells detect early biomarkers of a psoriasis flare-up in mice and release compounds to soothe or prevent the skin reaction.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Adding Padding

Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

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image: The 6,000-Calorie Diet

The 6,000-Calorie Diet

By | November 1, 2015

Overeating and inactivity lead to insulin resistance in just days—and oxidative stress is to blame.

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image: Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

Breaking the Cancer-Obesity Link

By , , and | November 1, 2015

Obese people are at higher risk for developing cancer, have worse prognoses once diagnosed, and are often resistant to chemotherapy regimens. The question is, Why?

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