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image: Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

By Tanya Lewis | April 21, 2016

Housing laboratory mice with those reared in a pet store makes the lab rodents’ immune systems more similar to those of people.

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image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By The Scientist Staff | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By Kerry Grens | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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image: One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

One Way Placenta Deflects Zika Infection

By Kerry Grens | April 5, 2016

Certain immune cells surrounding the organ appear to block viral entry.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By Anna Azvolinsky | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Tumor Traps

Tumor Traps

By Kerry Grens | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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image: The 2016 Salary Survey Is Here

The 2016 Salary Survey Is Here

By The Scientist Staff | March 18, 2016

Answer some brief questions and help us determine the most current salary outlook for life scientists and earn a chance to win a $100 Amazon gift card.

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image: More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

More Support for Allergen-Exposure Strategy

By Jef Akst | March 8, 2016

A second study finds evidence that feeding children peanuts could help prevent them from developing allergies to the legume later in life.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By Jyoti Madhusoodanan | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity

By Jef Akst | March 2, 2016

Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.

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