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image: Immunized Cows Produce Anti-HIV Antibodies

Immunized Cows Produce Anti-HIV Antibodies

By | July 20, 2017

Cows injected with a protein that mimics HIV’s envelope make broadly neutralizing antibodies that inhibit multiple strains of the virus.

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These institutions join around 60 others that hope to put increasing pressure on the publishing giant in ongoing negotiations for a new nationwide licensing agreement.

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image: On Blacklists and Whitelists

On Blacklists and Whitelists

By | July 17, 2017

Experts debate how best to point researchers to reputable publishers and steer them away from predatory ones.

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image: DNA Origami

DNA Origami

By | July 17, 2017

Will complex, folded synthetic DNA molecules one day serve as capsules to deliver drugs to cancer cells?

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image: Identifying Predatory Publishers

Identifying Predatory Publishers

By | July 17, 2017

How to tell reputable journals from shady ones

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

By | July 17, 2017

And the same endocannabinoid system that translates marijuana's buzz-inducing compounds into a high plays crucial roles in health and disease outside the brain.

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image: Endocannabinoids in the Groove

Endocannabinoids in the Groove

By | July 17, 2017

The system responsible for the buzz humans get from marijuana plays a passel of physiological roles outside the brain.

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image: Anti-Preeclampsia Hormone Discovered

Anti-Preeclampsia Hormone Discovered

By | June 29, 2017

A small, placenta-produced peptide fixes the pregnancy-related condition in mice. 

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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