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image: European Drug Regulator Releases Clinical Trial Data

European Drug Regulator Releases Clinical Trial Data

By | October 21, 2016

In the initial steps of a campaign to make clinical reports publicly available, the European Medicines Agency has published data on two recently approved drugs.

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image: Clinical Trial Database Launches

Clinical Trial Database Launches

By | October 12, 2016

OpenTrials.net seeks to increase transparency and make clinical research more accessible to the public.

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | October 1, 2016

Roger Tsien R.I.P., predatory publishing, and diversity in science

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image: Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

By | September 20, 2016

An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: Even More Preprints

Even More Preprints

By | August 17, 2016

A new psychology-centric preprint server is slated to launch.

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image: Opinion: Two Steps Toward Establishing Priority of Discovery

Opinion: Two Steps Toward Establishing Priority of Discovery

By | July 19, 2016

Establishing priority of a new finding is best achieved through a combination of a rapid, scientist-controlled disclosure followed by subsequent validation, through journal-based peer review and other mechanisms.

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