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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

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image: Sex Differences in the Brain

Sex Differences in the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

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image: “WikiGate” Ruffles OA Feathers

“WikiGate” Ruffles OA Feathers

By | September 16, 2015

A partnership between Wikipedia and scholarly publishing behemoth Elsevier has open-access advocates up in arms.

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image: Using FOIA to Read Scientists’ Emails

Using FOIA to Read Scientists’ Emails

By | September 8, 2015

Journalists and activists use the Freedom of Information Act to expose academics’ relationships with industry.

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image: New Journal Opens Research Process

New Journal Opens Research Process

By | September 3, 2015

An open-access journal that will publish research ideas, methods, workflows, and software has launched.

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image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

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image: Q&A: Placental Ponderings

Q&A: Placental Ponderings

By | August 27, 2015

Biologist Christopher Coe answers readers’ questions about the prescient organ.

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image: A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

A Case of Sexual Ambiguity, 1865

By | August 1, 2015

This year marks the 150th anniversary of an autopsy report describing the first known case of a sexual development disorder.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | August 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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