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image: Top 10 Retractions of 2016

Top 10 Retractions of 2016

By | December 21, 2016

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

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image: Opinion: The Scientist’s Scarlet Letter

Opinion: The Scientist’s Scarlet Letter

By | December 16, 2016

Managing privacy protections and expectations in a misconduct proceeding

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image: Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

By | December 16, 2016

A finding of misconduct spurs the retraction of a Science paper claiming to have identified a protein in mice that boosted immunity to both viruses and cancer.

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Lawyers involved discuss the latest twist in the ongoing litigation that pits pathologist Fazlul Sarkar against anonymous commenters on the post-publication peer review site.

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image: Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

By | December 2, 2016

Andrzej Tarkowski’s research laid the groundwork for future advances in cloning, stem cell research, and in vitro fertilization.

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Court of Appeals denies a motion filed by ACLU lawyers to enter the full Wayne State University investigation of pathologist Fazlul Sarkar into the official case record.

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image: How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

By | December 1, 2016

Sequencing and gene-editing advances make tracing a cells journey throughout development easier than ever.

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Lawyers for PubPeer have obtained and posted the full investigation report from Wayne State University, which lists more than 140 misconduct allegations against pathologist Fazlul Sarkar.

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image: Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

By | November 1, 2016

How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon

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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

26 Comments

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