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» misconduct, ecology and neuroscience

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The dolphins and their trainers will search for the endangered porpoises and enclose them in a protected pen.

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image: New Dean of USC Medical School Fired

New Dean of USC Medical School Fired

By | October 6, 2017

Rohit Varma’s termination, following the recent resignation of his predecessor over misbehavior, came as the Los Angeles Times prepared to report on a 2003 sexual harassment case.

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image: How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

By | October 6, 2017

Studies suggest not all critters fare well in extreme weather, though some thrive.

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image: Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

Giants of Circadian Biology Win Nobel Prize

By | October 2, 2017

The award in Physiology or Medicine goes to chronobiologists Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young.

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image: Image of the Day: A Shrimp and a Cockroach

Image of the Day: A Shrimp and a Cockroach

By | October 2, 2017

In the mantis shrimp brain, scientists uncover mushroom bodies—learning and memory structures typically found in the brains of insects. 

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Researchers suggest that the receptors can control early labor contractions.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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The 38-year-old synthetic biologist comes from a long line of tinkerers and engineers.

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image: Introducing Batman

Introducing Batman

By | October 1, 2017

Daniel Kish, who is blind, uses vocal clicks to navigate the world by echolocation.

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image: Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

Microglia Turnover in the Human Brain

By | October 1, 2017

Researchers find that about a quarter of the immune cells are replaced every year.

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