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image: The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

The Weird Growth Strategy of Earth’s First Trees

By | October 24, 2017

Ancient fossils reveal how woodless trees got so big: by continuously ripping apart their xylem and knitting it back together.

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Plantings of non-GM refuges counter the development of resistance.

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image: Study Illuminates Genetics of Skin Color

Study Illuminates Genetics of Skin Color

By | October 12, 2017

Researchers identified genes related to melanin levels in African populations.

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image: New Dean of USC Medical School Fired

New Dean of USC Medical School Fired

By | October 6, 2017

Rohit Varma’s termination, following the recent resignation of his predecessor over misbehavior, came as the Los Angeles Times prepared to report on a 2003 sexual harassment case.

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Critics of the proposed curriculum say it leaves out important information relating to climate change and evolution.

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image: Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

Do Pathogens Gain Virulence as Hosts Become More Resistant?

By | October 1, 2017

Emerging infections provide clues about how pathogens might evolve when farm animals are protected from infection.

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image: Infographic: Evolving Virulence

Infographic: Evolving Virulence

By | October 1, 2017

Tracking the myxoma virus in the wild rabbit populations of Australia has yielded insight into how pathogens and their hosts evolve.

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image: In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

By | September 28, 2017

Embedded within 3.95-billion-year-old rock, scientists have found graphite with a carbon signature that indicates biological activity.

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image: Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

Coastal Critters Make Epic Voyages After 2011 Tsunami

By | September 28, 2017

Marine species survived rafting thousands of kilometers on debris swept into the water by the giant wave, scientists say.

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image: How Poison Frogs Avoid Poisoning Themselves

How Poison Frogs Avoid Poisoning Themselves

By | September 21, 2017

Amphibians resist their own chemical defenses with amino acid modifications in the sequence for a target receptor.

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