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image: Contaminants Could’ve Accounted for STAP

Contaminants Could’ve Accounted for STAP

By | December 29, 2014

Embryonic stem cells likely mucked up the cultures used in the debunked “stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency” studies.

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image: Top Science Scandals of 2014

Top Science Scandals of 2014

By | December 25, 2014

The stem cell that never was; post-publication peer review website faces legal trouble; biosecurity breaches at federal labs

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image: STAP Author Can’t Replicate Results

STAP Author Can’t Replicate Results

By | December 22, 2014

RIKEN’s Haruko Obokata fails to replicate stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | December 18, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Journalists to Catalog Retractions

Journalists to Catalog Retractions

By | December 16, 2014

Staff of the blog Retraction Watch will create a database of papers retracted from the scientific literature.

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image: Iron-Ferrying Protein Impedes Pathogens

Iron-Ferrying Protein Impedes Pathogens

By | December 15, 2014

Meningitis-causing bacteria exerted strong evolutionary pressure on an iron-binding protein in primates, a study shows.

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image: Bird Genomes Abound

Bird Genomes Abound

By | December 11, 2014

Scientists complete the largest-ever comparative genomic study of birds.

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image: New Ruling on Old Misconduct Case

New Ruling on Old Misconduct Case

By | December 10, 2014

The Office of Research Integrity has finally pointed the finger in a case of suspected data manipulation in a 2006 Science paper.

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image: Evolution in Oil Droplets

Evolution in Oil Droplets

By | December 9, 2014

For the first time, researchers have mimicked biological evolution using chemicals instead of living organisms.

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image: Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

By | December 1, 2014

By horizontal gene transfer, an antibacterial gene family has dispersed to a plant, an insect, several fungi, and an archaeon.

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