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image: Image of the Day: Pseudomonas Autophagy

Image of the Day: Pseudomonas Autophagy

By The Scientist Staff | March 30, 2018

Researchers identify antibacterial functions of cell death in Arabidopsis when the plant is infected with Pseudomonas.  

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The drugs’ disruption of the microbiome makes a subsequent flavivirus infection more severe.

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image: Merino Sheep Provide Clue to Curly Hair

Merino Sheep Provide Clue to Curly Hair

By Catherine Offord | March 23, 2018

The cells on one side of each wool fiber are longer than the cells on the other, researchers find. 

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image: Bees’ Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids Determined

Bees’ Molecular Responses to Neonicotinoids Determined

By Catherine Offord | March 22, 2018

Researchers pinpoint a protein that can metabolize at least one of the insecticides, highlighting a route to identifying compounds that are friendlier to the critical pollinators.

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image: Image of the Day: Infection Imaging

Image of the Day: Infection Imaging

By The Scientist Staff | March 22, 2018

A new technique could allow researchers to better understand bacteria-host interactions over the course of an infection.

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A study finds that the vaccine’s effects wear off as a person ages, suggesting a need for booster shots.

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The findings suggest that faster synthesis, rather than decreased clearance, causes the protein to build up in neurons.

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image: Image of the Day: Flock of Algae

Image of the Day: Flock of Algae

By The Scientist Staff | March 21, 2018

Volvox barberi actively organize themselves into large colonies that optimize space.

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image: Image of the Day: Nuclear Pore Complex

Image of the Day: Nuclear Pore Complex

By The Scientist Staff | March 20, 2018

The structure has a stress-resilient architecture reminiscent of suspension bridges.

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image: Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut Bacteria

Many Non-Antibiotic Drugs Affect Gut Bacteria

By Catherine Offord | March 20, 2018

A new study finds that more than 200 human-targeted, non-antibiotic drugs inhibit the growth of bacterial species that make up part of the human microbiome.

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