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image: Mass Resignation from <em>Scientific Reports</em>’s Editorial Board

Mass Resignation from Scientific Reports’s Editorial Board

By Catherine Offord | November 7, 2017

Nineteen researchers have stepped down after the journal decided not to retract a paper that they say plagiarized the work of a Johns Hopkins biomedical scientist.

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image: Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

Image of the Day: Tadpole Prism

By The Scientist Staff | November 3, 2017

Scientists are making use of Xenopus tadpoles to study autism risk genes. 

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image: Corals’ pH Sensor Identified

Corals’ pH Sensor Identified

By Ashley P. Taylor | November 1, 2017

Soluble adenylyl cyclase measures and responds to pH changes in coral cells, but whether it can help the animals withstand ocean acidification is not yet known.

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image: Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

Opinion: How to Define Cell Type

By Sara B. Linker, Tracy A. Bedrosian, and Fred H. Gage | November 1, 2017

Advances in single-cell technologies have revealed vast differences between cells once thought to be in the same category, calling into question how we define cell type in the first place.

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image: Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

Infographic: Breaking into the Brain

By Amanda B. Keener | November 1, 2017

The blood-brain barrier is a collection of specialized cells and proteins that control the movement of molecules from the blood to the central nervous system.

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image: Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

Getting Drugs Past the Blood-Brain Barrier

By Amanda B. Keener | November 1, 2017

To treat neurological disease, researchers develop techniques to bypass or trick the guardian of the central nervous system.

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Research in human patients and mice reveals the role of the circadian clock in the risk of heart damage at different times of day.

1 Comment

With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

1 Comment

A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 

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image: Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

By Mikhail Tikhonov | October 12, 2017

Empirical data and humans’ biased interpretations can only get so far in truly understanding life at the microscale.

2 Comments

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