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With the arrival of a new class of single-nucleotide editors, researchers can target the most common type of pathogenic SNP in humans.

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A new study identifies microorganisms residing in the human fallopian tubes and uterus, but some researchers are skeptical of the findings. 

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image: Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

Opinion: Microbiology Needs More Math

By Mikhail Tikhonov | October 12, 2017

Empirical data and humans’ biased interpretations can only get so far in truly understanding life at the microscale.

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image: Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

Cesarean Section Results in Heavier Mouse Pups

By Ashley Yeager | October 11, 2017

Vaginal birth leads to changes in the development of offsprings’ microbiomes not seen among mice born via C-section, which researchers suspect might contribute to the weight differences.

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image: Plague Ravaging Madagascar

Plague Ravaging Madagascar

By Kerry Grens | October 10, 2017

Nearly four dozen people have died.

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image: Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

Image of the Day: Fragile Brain

By The Scientist Staff | October 3, 2017

In Fragile X syndrome—a genetic mishap that results in cognitive delays—the lack of a translation-repressing protein leads to the rampant accumulation of other proteins in the mouse brain.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By Aggie Mika | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Damage Patroller

Damage Patroller

By Anna Azvolinsky | October 1, 2017

Stephen Elledge has built a career studying how eukaryotic cells maintain genomic integrity.

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The 38-year-old synthetic biologist comes from a long line of tinkerers and engineers.

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image: Live Cell Extractions

Live Cell Extractions

By Ruth Williams | October 1, 2017

Nanostraws that collect specimens from cells without killing them allow for repeated sampling.

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