The Scientist

» birds and microbiology

Most Recent

image: How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

How Animals and Plants Weather Hurricanes

By Ashley Yeager | October 6, 2017

Studies suggest not all critters fare well in extreme weather, though some thrive.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By Aggie Mika | October 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2017 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

In Canada, Signs of Life Nearly 4 Billion Years Old

By Ashley P. Taylor | September 28, 2017

Embedded within 3.95-billion-year-old rock, scientists have found graphite with a carbon signature that indicates biological activity.

0 Comments

image: The Caterpillar that Cries Wolf

The Caterpillar that Cries Wolf

By Mary Bates | September 22, 2017

In a case of acoustic deception, caterpillars mimic bird alarm calls to defend themselves.

1 Comment

image: In-Depth Look at the Human Microbiome

In-Depth Look at the Human Microbiome

By Jef Akst | September 20, 2017

Hundreds of samples from microbes living in the gut, skin, mouth, and vagina add to the human microbiome “fingerprint.” 

1 Comment

image: Infection During Pregnancy Tied to Autism in Mouse Model

Infection During Pregnancy Tied to Autism in Mouse Model

By Kerry Grens | September 13, 2017

Bacterial strains in mice’s gut microbiomes mediated their pups’ risk for developing abnormal behaviors.

1 Comment

Exposure to the body’s humidity causes a film of the microbes to change shape, opening flaps in the garment to allow for increased airflow.

4 Comments

image: Brain Bugs

Brain Bugs

By The Scientist Staff | September 1, 2017

Neuropharmacologist John Cryan of University College of Cork in Ireland explains the links between the microbiome and the central nervous system.

1 Comment

image: Discovery of the Malaria Parasite, 1880

Discovery of the Malaria Parasite, 1880

By Shawna Williams | September 1, 2017

Most didn’t believe French doctor Charles Louis Alphonse Laveran when he said he’d spotted the causative agent of the disease—and that it was an animal.

0 Comments

image: Far-Out Science

Far-Out Science

By Mary Beth Aberlin | September 1, 2017

How psychedelic drugs and infectious microbes alter brain function

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How to Separate the Science From the (Jerk) Scientist
  2. Could a Dose of Sunshine Make You Smarter?
  3. Prevalent Form of Childhood Leukemia May Be Preventable
  4. Arizona Moves to Alter Wording About Evolution in Education