The Scientist

» birds and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | February 1, 2017

Instrumental in launching Arabidopsis thaliana as a model system, Elliot Meyerowitz has since driven the use of computational modeling to study developmental biology.

0 Comments

image: Science Your Plants!

Science Your Plants!

By | February 1, 2017

CalTech researcher Elliot Meyerowitz describes how plant genetics influences growth and productivity.

1 Comment

image: How Hummingbirds Sense Movement While Hovering

How Hummingbirds Sense Movement While Hovering

By | January 5, 2017

A visual motion-sensing brain region found in all four-limbed vertebrates displays unique properties in Anna’s hummingbirds.

0 Comments

Children born to obese parents are at increased risk of failing motor development and cognitive tests, according to an NIH-led study.

0 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | December 23, 2016

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

2 Comments

Standard taxonomy lumps together bird species that should be separate, a new study suggests, raising the total number of estimated species from 9,000 to 18,000.

1 Comment

image: Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

By | December 2, 2016

Andrzej Tarkowski’s research laid the groundwork for future advances in cloning, stem cell research, and in vitro fertilization.

0 Comments

Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

3 Comments

image: How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

How to Track Cell Lineages As They Develop

By | December 1, 2016

Sequencing and gene-editing advances make tracing a cells journey throughout development easier than ever.

0 Comments

image: Slideshow: Nerdy Birdies

Slideshow: Nerdy Birdies

By | December 1, 2016

Meet the pigeons that are redefining what it means to behave like a human by displaying remarkable pattern recognition abilities.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. A Newly Identified Species Represents Its Own Eukaryotic Lineage
  2. Telomere Length and Childhood Stress Don’t Always Correlate
  3. Optogenetic Therapies Move Closer to Clinical Use
  4. Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration
    The Nutshell Research Links Gut Health to Neurodegeneration

    Rodent studies presented at the Society for Neuroscience meeting this week tie pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract or microbiome composition with Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases.

RayBiotech