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image: 2017 Top 10 Innovations

2017 Top 10 Innovations

By | December 1, 2017

From single-cell analysis to whole-genome sequencing, this year’s best new products shine on many levels.

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image: Smoking on a Chip

Smoking on a Chip

By | September 1, 2017

A new device from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University simulates the effects of cigarette smoke on human lungs.

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image: Menstruation on a Chip

Menstruation on a Chip

By | August 30, 2017

This device models the female reproductive tract and might lead scientists to a greater understanding of fibroids, cancer, and infertility.

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image: Organs on Chips

Organs on Chips

By | August 28, 2017

Scientists hope that these devices will one day replace animal models of disease and help advance personalized medicine.

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image: The Mechanobiology Garage

The Mechanobiology Garage

By | July 17, 2017

New tools for investigating how physical forces affect cells

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image: Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

By | July 14, 2017

Researchers develop a method that combines the strengths of shotgun metagenomics and single-cell genome sequencing in a microfluidics-based platform.

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image: Top 10 Innovations 2016

Top 10 Innovations 2016

By | December 1, 2016

This year’s list of winners celebrates both large leaps and small (but important) steps in life science technology.

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image: Designing In Vitro Models of the Blood-Brain Barrier

Designing In Vitro Models of the Blood-Brain Barrier

By | September 1, 2016

Choosing the right model, be it 3-D or 2-D, requires wading through varied cell sources, cell types, and cell culture conditions.

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image: Bacterial Baddies

Bacterial Baddies

By | August 1, 2016

Scientist to Watch Cullen Buie, MIT researcher, talks about his quest to devise a method for quickly determining the pathogenicity of microbes.

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image: Cullen Buie Parses Pathogens With Passion

Cullen Buie Parses Pathogens With Passion

By | August 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT. Age: 34

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